SMBs Benefit From Hybrid Cloud Data Storage And Federated Clouds

Guest Author: This week’s blog was provided to us by Ted Navarro, a technical writer and inbound marketer for ComputeNext – an innovative marketplace company. Check out the ComputeNext blog for the latest postings and engage in the discussions on cloud computing and IaaS technolgy by clicking here. Or you can follow them on Twitter and like them on Facebook.

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Federated hybrid clouds allow businesses to distribute their data in accordance with their priorities while leveraging the full advantage of the cloud.

In spite of the obvious benefits of cloud data storage, many small and medium businesses are hesitant to entrust all of their data to the cloud. Cloud storage offers lower management and support burdens, lower capital expenditure, greater scalability, and increased opportunities for collaboration.

Nevertheless, the cloud is not perfect. Managers worry about availability issues: connectivity problems could bring a business to a standstill if mission critical data was unreachable. Some data is considered too important to entrust to the cloud; in spite of cloud providers’ considerable efforts to ensure the security of data, influencers within businesses have IP, security, and privacy concerns.

Hybrid cloud storage offers a solution that helps businesses resolve their cloud concerns without throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

Not all data is equally important. The majority of data that businesses generate does not need to be accessible constantly. Although most cloud vendors do in fact manage to maintain levels of availability that equal or exceed those of in-house solutions, it’s always possible that a natural disaster will knock out connectivity to the data center and render data unreachable.

To handle “expect the unexpected” scenarios, businesses are implementing hybrid solutions that allow them to leverage the benefits of the cloud while also maintaining data availability. A core set of data that must be consistently available can be kept on-site, with the rest moved up to the cloud. The burden on in-house IT staff and infrastructure is slashed while allowing businesses to be confident that their most important data is kept close by.

In other cases, instead of splitting their data between public and private clouds, businesses are using public cloud storage for backup and redundancy. Maintaining adequate numbers of servers on-site to provide a fully redundant system is wasteful when less expensive replication can be achieved by moving data to the cloud. Additionally, backups should be off-site to be truly effective, and the cloud allows for low-complexity automated off-site backup processes.

The cloud is not an all-or-nothing solution. There are significant business benefits to be reaped from implementations that spread data storage across multiple locations. In many cases, it’s advisable to also use different vendors for maximal redundancy.

An ideal scenario might see essential data held on a private cloud within a business’ firewall and replicated onto a cloud vendor’s platform for backup. Less crucial archival data may be placed with another vendor. Data that needs to be available on a short time scale and integrated with logistics or customer relationship management applications may be stored with yet another vendor. Vendor diversification is a powerful strategy for business continuity.

In that scenario, the company’s IT infrastructure moves beyond the simple private-public split of the hybrid cloud and becomes a true federated cloud. In previous years, maintaining a federated multi-cloud environment would have been more work than it was worth for a small business, but since the advent of cloud marketplaces that allow for the comparison and selection of vendors and the management of federated environments from one interface, redundant federated clouds are well within the reach of small and medium businesses.

How Cloud Computing Helps Small Businesses Level the Playing Field

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It has been said that the digital age has reduced the gap that used to exist between big companies and their smaller counterparts, if only because it’s easier for small businesses to reach out directly to customers. That might be true, but any small business owner can tell you that the bigger names still enjoy a number of important advantages – namely that they have larger budgets to work with, and can take advantage of economies of scale. When it comes to IT and business technology, those advantages can be a very big deal. Bigger spending leads to bigger performance and relatively lower expenses. In other words, it means that large organizations can afford to take advantage of things that small companies can’t…

Or at least that they used to be able to outspend smaller companies.

Cloud computing and colocation are changing all of that. By altering the way technology is used and budgeted, these two services are making it possible for small businesses to afford the high-powered tools and systems that their bigger competitors have access to.

Why Cloud Computing and Colocation Make IT a Fair Fight

When smaller businesses switch to cloud computing and colocation with a Canadian data centre, the size of the company, or its budget, doesn’t matter nearly as much. Here are a few of the most important reasons why:

Smaller businesses get access to better software through cloud computing. In the past, small businesses may have passed on investing in software applications that could help them grow their business because the costs were too prohibitive, or at least held off on making version upgrades. With cloud computing, though – and monthly subscriptions instead of big upfront investments – those barriers to critical software are removed.

Cloud computing and colocation mean lower, fixed IT expenses. Obviously, every small business owner or manager likes saving money. But, as an underrated side effect, these two types of IT leasing also allow for a fixed monthly expenses, meaning that it’s easier to plan for future cash flow. Why not give your company more money to spend elsewhere in the budget?

Cloud computing and colocation are both scalable. Over the past decade, lots of businesses have come to regret making huge investments in technology, watching it depreciate (or need to be replaced) even as business conditions remained unstable. By taking advantage of cloud computing and colocation, you can increase or decrease your level of service without making a big commitment now, or being tied to a huge monthly invoice later.

Small businesses enjoy better data security. One thing more and more companies are discovering is that keeping things like hardware and critical data in their offices is a bad idea. Break-ins, fires, and equipment failure all have to be considered and planned for. But, with leased IT in a remote location, encrypted file transfers, and continuous automated backup systems working for you, colocation and cloud computing can take away those worries.

With cloud computing and colocation, you don’t need a big IT team. In fact, when you make the move to these kinds of remote technology systems, you might be able to remove your IT team altogether. That can be a great way to lower your overall expenses while enjoying the same level of service and benefits that you and your employees have become accustomed to.

The best way to discover whether cloud computing or colocation in a Canadian data centre are a good fit for your small business – or find out exactly how much you could save on a monthly and yearly basis – is to call a provider and learn what solutions they have available. In almost every case, new clients find that it takes a lot less than they had imagined to enjoy the kind of IT care that big businesses take for granted.

Are You Too Worried About Cloud Security?

Should you wait, or push forward? Is it better to embrace the new technology, or to wait for it to be improved and refined? These are questions that come up again and again in virtually every part of the business world, but they seem particularly apt when it comes to the phenomenon that is cloud computing – the hottest IT trend in the world and a way for businesses of all sizes to gain huge performance advantages on smaller budgets.

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On the surface, there isn’t much not to love about cloud computing. By moving your hardware and software to a remote location and accessing it via the web, you gain the ability to access real-time information from any web-enabled device… and all while taking advantage of those cost savings we already mentioned. A relatively sizable minority of small businesses is holding off on making the transition just yet, however, because they have concerns about cloud security.

Should you wait right alongside them? Or, is worrying too much about cloud security holding you back from making a decision that can help your company? As always, there isn’t a cut-and-dried answer to that question. While security breaches have been relatively rare, there have been some valid concerns when it comes to cloud security at some facilities, and with some vendors. However, those concerns shouldn’t be pressing enough to stop most organizations from making the switch.

To understand why, consider the basic model that most reputable cloud computing package providers employ to keep data safe. Generally speaking they do deter, prevent, correct, and detect – or do everything they can to scare thieves away, stop them from accessing data, limit the damage they can do, and then fix any known security issues quickly. To get a sense of how that actually works in the real world, consider some of the major safeguards that cloud computing providers using Canadian data centres put into place to protect the flow and integrity of client data:

Maximum strength encryption: In the best Canadian colocation data centres, high-level encryption is used for the transmission of files to and from client workstations. Although maximum strength encryption can theoretically be broken, cyber criminals almost always look for smaller and easier targets that are more vulnerable.

Comprehensive antivirus scanning: It isn’t unusual for a single virus, introduced by the wrong download or email attachment, to infect multiple computers within the same small business network quickly. At a state-of-the-art cloud computing facility, however, continuous antivirus scans mean that bits of problematic code are identified and quarantined very quickly.

On-site protection: In a lot of small businesses, servers, backup hard drives, and other pieces of hardware containing sensitive data are often left completely unguarded and out in the open. At a cloud facility, trained security personnel are on the premises around the clock – as are engineers and systems experts to monitor the hardware and flow of information.

Redundancy systems: When you lose an important piece of hardware in your office or facility, it’s likely that the important files you need have disappeared forever. Because files stored in the cloud are continuously backed up, however, even a natural disaster won’t cause you to lose information like client records that you desperately need to keep your company going.

Environmental controls. You can’t find a better environment for cloud computing than the ones you’ll find in our Canadian data centres, where continuous power backups, strict climate control, and a lack of natural disasters all work in our favor. Plus, we have a very stable government with strict privacy laws, so you don’t have to worry that any organization is going to have an unauthorized look through your company’s records.

When it comes down to it, we can’t guarantee beyond every doubt that a security breach will never take place at our cloud facility, or at any of the others across the country. What we can promise you, however, is that the steps we take to safeguard important information are much, much stronger than the ones you would find in most corporate offices… and certainly at a higher level than the ones most small businesses use.

The issue, then, isn’t whether cloud security should be a concern, but whether you can really believe that you’re safer without cloud computing in a Canadian data centre.

To learn more about cloud computing, check out our white paper Cutting IT Costs with Cloud Computing.

Data Centers Canada Presents: Move Your Contact Centre into the Cloud

Data Centers Canada, a division of TeraGo Networks, recently posted an article on their blog site discussing the advantages of moving your business’s contact centre into the cloud. Below, we’ve provided a copy of the article:

Save Money and Improve Customer Service by Moving Your Contact Centre into the Cloud

Cloud computing is transforming the way we think about technology and communications, with new applications coming to light all the time. One of the most exciting – and one with a huge potential to save businesses a lot of money – is the ability to make your customer service contact centre cloud based.

How does a cloud contact centre work in conjunction with colocation at a Canadian data centre? In essence, it simply means that your calls are routed to Internet-connected workstations through a configurable software package. You control where the calls go, to whom, and what information is displayed to customer service representatives in real time. Because software is hosted online, and the calls are handled over the Internet through VOIP, your business gets bigger capabilities at a fraction of the cost.

With VOIP systems already standard in companies of all sizes, it’s no wonder that so many are turning to cloud platforms to lower costs and increase customer service effectiveness. It’s a classic win-win scenario, and one that virtually any organization can take advantage of.

To help illustrate the reasons why, here are seven big advantages you enjoy when you move your contact centre into the cloud:

1. You eliminate customer service hardware costs. One of the tremendous advantages you gain with any cloud computing platform is the freedom to do away with expensive and unreliable on-site hardware. The savings are especially important when you’re talking about servers, telephone switchboards, and other pieces of technology traditionally needed for customer service. By embracing colocation with a Canadian data centre, you can eliminate fixed investments and take advantage of less expensive monthly agreements.

2. More customer service capabilities. While a lot of businesses are limited to simply engaging customers over the phone, cloud contact centres can allow users to participate in real-time chat sessions and, in some situations, even screen-sharing sessions. That means your representatives can diagnose problems and assist buyers more quickly than ever before.

3. Better customer service call routing. Cloud contact centres work through infinitely customizable software packages. So, you can decide whether to offer menu prompts to callers, where to route incoming calls, and even whether to split them between different locations, departments, or priorities. With this increased control, businesses can deal with their most important inquiries first, and help customers to find the contact or information they’re looking for faster.

4. Real-time customer information. One of the greatest things about cloud computing platforms is that they work in real time, so software can be updated for all users in an instant. Since that includes databases, your customer service team can have the account-specific information they need, continuously updated and ready at a moment’s notice. That allows them to see what happened during previous interactions, view the details of orders, and check things like shipping without any delay.

5. Customer service scalability. When your cloud customer service system is set up using colocation at a Canadian data centre, you always have the option of expanding your operations quickly – and without investing in new call centre locations or buying expensive telecommunications equipment. Simply make a change in your account, based on your current or forecasted future needs, and your usage settings can be adjusted overnight.

6. Better data security. Colocation is a great way to make all of your technology safer, with encrypted connections, automated backups, and secure facilities that are monitored around the clock. That’s especially important when it comes to customer service, since you don’t want buyer information and order details being seen by unauthorized third parties. With the right Canadian data centre, you won’t have to worry about where your data is being stored, or where it might be going when you aren’t looking.

7. Less customer service downtime. Because cloud computing and colocation systems are notably more reliable than traditional in-office telecommunications packages, your customer service team spends less time offline. That means a more consistent experience for buyers, higher customer retention rates, and a better reputation in your industry.

A lot of businesses are just finding out about colocation contact centres for the first time, but they are quickly learning that there is a lot to love about handling incoming calls in the cloud. Is it time you looked into a better way to keep buyers happy and save money all at the same time?

To learn more about data centre technologies and trends, check out the Data Centers Canada blog by clicking here.

The Great NSA Debate has Companies Moving to Canada

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This week, privacy advocates around the world staged a protest online in an attempt to protect their data and company information from the world’s government intelligence agencies. Over 6,000 websites took part in the protest, which was branded as “The Day We Fight Back” campaign, by displaying banners at the bottom of their web pages to encourage individuals and companies to participate. Heavy hitters like Google, Twitter, and Mozilla took part in the protest.

Even though the protest itself was more of a whimper than a roar, the controversy over government surveillance still had a significant impact on the businesses economy south of the Canadian border. A recent estimate completed by the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation stated that the American economy could stand to lost up to $35 billion in lost revenues as a result. Because of our proximity to the U.S., skilled workforce, cold climate, and affordable energy sources, Canada is a very ideal location for businesses who no longer want to house their data in the States. Several businesses have already made the move to a Canadian-based data centre, including European banking and insurance firms with operations in the States as well as American retail outlets and oil and gas companies.

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Telus and Rogers are expecting data storage sales in Canada to increase by 20% this year, not including the number of businesses seeking refuge from the ever-watching eye of the NSA. Though it would be naive to assume to any data stored in Canada is fully exempt from government surveillance, there are stricter rules on what government agencies can access. The Canadian Privacy Act, established in 1983, limits the amount of personal information the government can collect, use, and disclose.

So what does this mean for Canadian businesses? With more businesses looking for storage in data centre colocation facilities, there will be increased competition for space. Data centres are a finite resource. Once the space is gone – it’s gone, putting pressure on Canadian companies to get their foot in the door before the data centre is full. Many companies will also be looking to utilize cloud computing services, further driving the demand.

There will also be an increased need for bandwidth as businesses transfer data to their colocation facility or cloud, so obtaining a reliable and secure high speed connection is critical. In order to obtain the full benefits of cloud computing, users will require a symmetrical connection so they can upload and download data at an efficient rate.

To learn more about Canadian data centres, click here.

Blog Author: Vanessa Hartung

Holes in the Internet of Things

In previous blogs, we discussed the benefits of embracing the Internet of Things (IoT) for business. In fact, many companies are already using IoT technologies to save on resources, optimize operations, and cut costs. Some examples include the use of real-time data collection and alerts to let municipal workers know that a garbage bin is full, or running real-world A/B tests by using networked cameras and sensors to detect how customers are engaging with specific products. But how does one manage the abundance of data coming in from each “thing”?

Sure, from a business perspective, the answer is an easy: hire more employees and store any data collected in a data centre. But what about the consumers? Take a moment to count the number of emails, alerts, messages, and updates you receive on just one of your devices – your cell phone, for example. Now add in all the data that you could receive, like an alert from your smart home informing you that the furnace filter needs to be cleaned, or an email from your car to let you know that the oil needs to be changed, or even a reminder from your plants to water the garden.

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The vast amount of incoming information can overwhelm consumers, and it’s likely that buyers will hit a ceiling of what they’re willing to babysit. Once the “cool factor” of a new IoT device subsides, the chore of responding to all the incoming messages can set in, leaving users frustrated and exhausted. In addition to responding to all the incoming information, users will then need to decide how they will manage and store the data. Typically, homes don’t come equipped with a built-in data centre. Therefor, consumers will need some type of system in place to help them respond, manage, and store the information provided by their IoT devices.

This is where we find the hole. There doesn’t seem to be a holistic solution in the market today that can help users efficiently manage their data and devices. Sure, there are companies soliciting the cloud for consumers, but they tend to be targeted to each specific operating system. For example, Apple has a cloud that connects all their devices – but you can’t sync your BlackBerry device to the Apple cloud – and vice versa. Consumers need help from businesses to manage their devices and all the data they’ll soon be getting.

Businesses that are looking to capitalize on the wave of IoT devices need to take this into consideration. Usability is essential in creating a successful product or service, because consumers won’t be willing to waste their valuable time on managing data. Since businesses looking to utilize IoT technology will need a place to store their data anyway, why not provide space to your customers as well? If your company hasn’t started exploring data centre options, and you’re looking to capitalize on IoT, you can begin exploring your colocation options by clicking here.

Blog Author: Vanessa Hartung

Having Trouble Securing Your Data? So is the Federal Government

Security breaches seem to be occurring on a regular basis lately, as more and more reports of lost data and hackers flood news headlines. Many businesses store their information in a virtual environment, but do little to protect it once it gets there. Complacency and a lack of understanding is  contributing the the number of attacks – and businesses aren’t the only ones being targeted by hackers.

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In an annual report to Parliament on Tuesday, commissioner Jennifer Stoddart reported that the number of data breaches reported by federal institutions between April 2012 and March 2013 rose from 80 to 109 during the same period the year before  (click here for report). Hackers are breaking into federal networks in record numbers, yet it seems as though this issue isn’t being taken seriously. Several of the reported incidents could have been prevented if the proper security measures were in place. Treating cyber crime as random and unpredictable is counter productive for government and business.

Employee negligence, or “human error”, was responsible for a majority of the federal government’s stolen data, with hacking and malware encompass the rest. Some of the stolen data included:

  • Human Resources Development Canada (now called Employment and Social Development Canada) reported that a staff member lost a portable hard drive that contained 585,000 personal records
  • A Justice Department employee lost a USB key that contained sensitive information on 5,000 people
  • A USB key, papers, and a laptop that contained information used by the Financial Transaction and Reports Analysis Centre (FINTRAC) was stolen in Calgary
  • A Security Intelligence Officer working for Corrections Canada had dropped a USB key containing personal information about 152 prisoners was lost while the Officer was dropping off a child at school
  • The personal tax information of 46 people was stolen along with an employee’s laptop

And the list goes on. It’s frightening to think that federal employees are so complacent with the personal information of others, but it happens every day. No one believes that it will happen to them, until it does. However, ignorance is not bliss, nor is it an effective method of data protection.

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Employees need to be responsible for the protection of portable devices, especially the devices containing private information. Many business and government establishes take the time to install the best security measures, but the moment an employee transports data – the risk of a data breach increases drastically. This is becoming increasingly difficult to control as virtual environments continue to increase in use. Although it may be convenient, companies need to be aware of the risks associated with virtually accessible and transported data.

Some of the ways that companies can help decrease the amount of data lost to “human error” is through education, awareness, and guidelines. By educating and alerting your employees about the methods used by cyber criminals to gain access to private data, they’ll have a better understanding of how to keep the data secure. Additionally, creating awareness will show your employees that cyber crime is a reality that can happen to anyone, anytime. It’s not just something you hear about on the news, it’s something that hundreds of companies have experienced across North America.

Establishing some rules and guidelines around transporting sensitive data, either in a USB key, laptop, or external hard drive, can also help keep data safe. By attaching consequences to an employees actions, such as losing a USB key, it’s likely that they’ll remain vigilant. The other option would be to restrict the transportation of data all together by utilizing cloud technology. By moving all your data to a online environment, your employees can access the information from anywhere, anytime.

To learn more about storing your data in a safe location, click here.

Blog author: Vanessa Hartung

Deciding What to Put in the Cloud

Guest Author: This week’s blog post was provided to us by Tanya Williams, a freelance writer and blogger. She has been working with telecom companies for over 20 years, writing about new technologies and how businesses and business owners can take advantage of them. Her topics included IP based communications technologies, cloud computing, website developement, and many more.

Situation: “I have clients across North America, and some of my critical parts come from around the globe. I have a robust ERO system that helps me keep on top of production, deliveries, and collection. I have decided to move into Unified Communications to speed up everything. – Now, what part of my application should go to the cloud for my vendors and clients to see? What about safety and security?”

This situation may be specific, but is common among many business organizations. Clients and partners can come from different places all over the globe. However, the answer generally lies in the amount of information or applications that will be put in the cloud for general use across the organization, as well as issues relating to security and safety.

Here are some factors to consider when deciding what your company should put in the cloud.

  • Provider Responsibilities: As an organization, it is very important to be comfortable with giving up a certain level of control to cloud providers. Organizations who choose to take advantage of deploying on-premise platforms typically own the unified communications application. Upgrades, enhancements, extensions and other integrations are done as needed. Cloud providers do allow a certain level of management to the users, such as managing their servers, but organizations may not have full control.
  • Potential savings: When talking about savings which can be potentially achieved, it is vital to acknowledge that these savings are indeed, real. Research was conducted by Search Unified Communications in 2013 discussing the cost analysis of cloud technology vs. on-premises IP telephony. It concluded that a significant amount of savings is realized when incorporating this type of technology in businesses.
  • Availability: Cloud-based unified communication services are practically available all over the world. However, only a few companies have the capability of supporting and delivering a single global cloud service through diverse geographies. Therefore, if you have partners, clients and sites distributed throughout Europe, North America and Asia, it is possible to acquire such technology with the help of a limited number of possible partners who can provide support to all sites.
  • Services offered: For quite a while, cloud-based unified communications services lacked some features and applications needed to compare to on-premise solutions. Among such features are mobile extensibility, video and a wide range of end-points solutions. However, the evolution of the technology has increased the popularity of the cloud. Leading providers have developed various platforms that are derived from the original infrastructures, incorporating them to the existing platform.
  • Cloud management: It is a common belief that by using the services offered by cloud technology, a user organization offloads itself from responsibilities, casting the burden to the providers. However, such relationships require a good partnership between the cloud provider and the organization. The overall success of the delivery of services requires access to the company’s internal network coming from the operations center to the provider.

Therefore, the abovementioned tips will certainly assist an organization in evaluating the services offered by cloud technology. It is vital to keep in mind that these applications continue to evolve rapidly. Taking note of any possible future enhancements can also help in making decisions as to the amount of information, and the number of applications that should be put in the cloud. Bottom line is that taking advantage of the benefits now can make an organization well prepared for further enhancements in the future.

What’s Preventing your Company from Adopting the Cloud?

Without a doubt, the number of IT professionals utilizing cloud technology is steadily increasing. The cloud provides companies with a secure, convenient virtual location to store their data. Many companies are also using the cloud for disaster recovery and Platform as a Service (PaaS). However, a recent study has revealed some unanticipated hurdles that companies need to overcome in order to adopt cloud computing.

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The study, conducted by TheInfoPro, found that people, process, policy, and organizational issues are the four biggest obstacles to overcome when adopting cloud technology. It’s undeniable that cloud computing is expected to grow exponentially over the next couple years, but the roadblocks mentioned above are impacting the completion of any cloud related projects.

83% of IT professionals reported that they are experiencing difficulty implementing their cloud computing initiatives, which is a 9% increase since the end of 2012. However, IT-related roadblocks have actually decreased by 15%. Of the 83% of respondents that cited difficulties, 68% reported non-IT related obstacles as the problem.

The study also revealed that cloud security was another significant pain point for IT professionals. However, there is a variety of software and hardware tools available to IT members looking for increased protection. Additionally, many cloud vendors are recognizing that security is a concern for IT employees and are taking steps to implement additional protection.

Installing firewalls and obtaining your Internet connection through a reputable provider is two simple ways IT members can help protect the company network. However, when it comes to obstacles that are outside the control of IT employees, the solution isn’t quite as simple. Prior to implementing cloud initiatives, department leaders must be aligned. If every department is doing their part to support the implementation of cloud technology, the transition will be much easier.

To read the study conducted by TheInfoPro, click here.

To learn more about obtaining a secure Internet connection, click here.

Blog author: Vanessa Hartung

Cloud Providers are Utilizing Colocation to Deliver Services

Businesses aren’t the only ones looking to benefit from colocation services. Several cloud computing providers are making the decision to lease space in a colocation facility instead of purchasing or building their own data centers. The cost associated with constructing and managing a data center is significant, and many cloud providers aren’t interested in making the investment.

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According to Reed Construction Data, the cost of building a standard one story 22,500 square foot data center starts around $7 million dollars. For many start-up cloud providers, they simply can’t afford to build or outfit a data center. Even the larger, well established cloud providers are opting to lease data center space instead of building or buying their own.

Most cloud providers are choosing to lease space because they need an efficient and robust data center to deliver their service. By utilizing colocation, providers are able to focus more on other aspects of their business, such as advertising or customer service, instead of spending money on hardware, power, or cooling facilities. Providers need to stay current and utilize marketing to establish a competitive edge in order to compete with the hundreds of cloud establishments in the marketplace.

Colocation also offers the opportunity to reach globally dispersed customers quickly. Instead of building an entirely new data center facility, cloud providers are able to lease space in multiple data center locations. This gives them a great deal of flexibility because they are not limited to a single location. It also provides them with a larger target market because they are no longer confined to one geographical area.

Utilizing colocation to deliver cloud services is quickly growing in popularity as more and more providers recognize the benefits. Although building or buying a data center facility may still be the right strategy for some cloud providers, colocation is making it easier for start-ups to enter and compete in the cloud market.

To learn more about the benefits of colocation, click here.

Blog Author: Vanessa Hartung

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